Monuments and Landmarks in Dublin (Ireland)

General Post Office, Dublin
  • General Post Office, Dublin

    The General Post Office (GPO; Irish: Ard-Oifig an Phoist) in Dublin is the headquarters of An Post, the Irish Post Office, and Dublin's principal post office. Sited in the centre of O'Connell Street, the city's main thoroughfare, it is one of Ireland's most famous buildings, and was the last of the great Georgian public buildings erected in the capital.
Abbey Theatre
  • Abbey Theatre

    The Abbey Theatre (Irish: Amharclann na Mainistreach), also known as the National Theatre of Ireland (Irish: Amharclann Náisiúnta na hÉireann), in Dublin, Republic of Ireland, first opened its doors to the public on 27 December 1904. Despite losing its original building to a fire in 1951, it has remained active to the present day. The Abbey was the first state-subsidized theatre in the English-speaking world; from 1925 onwards it received an annual subsidy from the Irish Free State. Since July ...
Irish Stock Exchange
  • Irish Stock Exchange

    The Irish Stock Exchange (ISE; Irish: Stocmhalartán na hÉireann) is Ireland's main stock exchange, and has been in existence since 1793. The Irish Stock Exchange lists debt and fund securities and is used as a European gateway exchange for companies seeking to access investors in Europe and beyond. With over 35,000 securities listed on its markets, the ISE is used by over 4,000 issuers from more than 85 countries to raise funds and access international investors. A study by Indecon (international economic ...
Four Courts
  • Four Courts

    The Four Courts (Irish: Na Ceithre Cúirteanna) is Ireland's main courts building, located on Inns Quay in Dublin. The Four Courts is the location of the Supreme Court, the Court of Appeal, the High Court and the Dublin Circuit Court. Until 2010 the building also housed the Central Criminal Court; this is now located in the Criminal Courts of Justice.
Christ Church Cathedral, Dublin
  • Christ Church Cathedral, Dublin

    Christ Church Cathedral (or, more formally, The Cathedral of the Holy Trinity) is the cathedral of the United Dioceses of Dublin and Glendalough and the cathedral of the Ecclesiastical province of the United Provinces of Dublin and Cashel in the Church of Ireland. It is situated in Dublin, Ireland, and is the elder of the capital city's two medieval cathedrals, the other being St Patrick's Cathedral.
Jameson Irish Whiskey
  • Jameson Irish Whiskey

    Jameson /ˈdʒɛ.mə.sən/ is a blended Irish whiskey produced by the Irish Distillers subsidiary of Pernod Ricard. The John Jameson and Son Irish Whiskey company was formally established in 1810 when John Jameson and his son (also John Jameson) took ownership of the Bow Street Distillery in Dublin which had originally been built by his wife's cousins the Steins in 1780. Jameson was a Scottish lawyer from Alloa in Clackmannanshire who had married Margaret Haig, a sister of the Haig brothers who ...
Leinster House
  • Leinster House

    Leinster House (Irish: Teach Laighean) is the seat of the Oireachtas, the parliament of Ireland. Leinster House was originally the ducal palace of the Dukes of Leinster. Since 1922, it is a complex of buildings, of which the former ducal palace is the core, which house Oireachtas Éireann, its members and staff. The most recognisable part of the complex, and the "public face" of Leinster House, continues to be the former ducal palace at the core of the complex.
The Brazen Head
  • The Brazen Head

    The Brazen Head is a pub in Merchant's Quay, Dublin. It was built as a coaching inn in 1754, on the site of a merchant's dwelling dating back to at least 1613. Local tradition claims that the site has housed a tavern or alehouse since 1198, although there is no documentary evidence to support this. Kelleher claims it first received a licence to sell ale in 1661, and the first mention of it as an inn occurs in 1668.
St Stephen's Green
  • St Stephen's Green

    St Stephen's Green (Irish: Faiche Stiabhna) is a city centre public park in Dublin, Ireland. The current landscape of the park was designed by William Sheppard. It was officially re-opened to the public on Tuesday, 27 July 1880 by Lord Ardilaun. The park is adjacent to one of Dublin's main shopping streets, Grafton Street, and to a shopping centre named for it, while on its surrounding streets are the offices of a number of public bodies as well as a ...
St Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin
  • St Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin

    Saint Patrick's Cathedral (Irish: Ard-Eaglais Naomh Pádraig) in Dublin, Ireland, founded in 1191, is the National Cathedral of the Church of Ireland. With its 43-metre (141 ft) spire, St. Patrick's is the tallest church in Ireland and the largest. Christ Church Cathedral, also a Church of Ireland cathedral in Dublin, is designated as the local Cathedral of the diocese of Dublin and Glendalough.
Royal Canal
  • Royal Canal

    The Royal Canal (Irish: An Chanáil Ríoga) is a canal originally built for freight and passenger transportation from the River Liffey in Dublin to Longford in Ireland. The canal fell into disrepair in the late 20th century, but much of the canal has since been restored for navigation. The length of the canal to the River Shannon was reopened on 1 October 2010, but the final spur branch of the canal to Longford Town remains closed.
3Arena
  • 3Arena

    The 3Arena (originally The O2) is an indoor amphitheatre located at North Wall Quay in the Dublin Docklands in Dublin, Ireland. The venue opened on 16 December 2008. It was built on the site of the former Point Theatre, a smaller music venue which operated from 1988 to 2007, retaining only some of the outer facade. The Point Theatre was branded as "The Point Depot", in recognition of its original role as a railway goods handling station. The venue was ...
Dublin Port Tunnel
  • Dublin Port Tunnel

    The Dublin Tunnel (Irish: Tollán Bhaile Átha Cliath), originally and still commonly known as the Dublin Port Tunnel, is a road traffic tunnel in Dublin, Ireland, that forms part of the M50 motorway. The twin tunnels form a two-lane dual carriageway connecting Dublin Port, which lies to the east of central Dublin, and the M50 motorway at junction 2, close to Dublin Airport. The tunnels are 4.5 km (2.8 mi) in length and total project length of 5.6 km (3.5 mi). ...
Aviva Stadium
  • Aviva Stadium

    The Aviva Stadium (also known as Lansdowne Road; Irish: Staid Aviva) is a sports stadium located in Dublin, Ireland, with a capacity for 51,700 spectators (all seated). It is built on the site of the former Lansdowne Road stadium, which was demolished in 2007, and replacing it as home to its chief tenants: the Irish rugby union team and the Republic of Ireland football team. The decision to redevelop the stadium came after plans for both Stadium Ireland and ...
Dublin Zoo
  • Dublin Zoo

    Dublin Zoo (Irish: Zú Bhaile Átha Cliath), in Phoenix Park, Dublin, is the largest zoo in Ireland, and one of Dublin's most popular attractions. Opened in 1831, the zoo describes its role as conservation, study, and education. Its stated mission is to "work in partnership with zoos worldwide to make a significant contribution to the conservation of the endangered species on Earth". Covering over 28 hectares (69 acres) of Phoenix Park, it is divided into areas named Asian Forests, Orangutan Forest, ...
Merrion Square
  • Merrion Square

    Merrion Square (Irish: Cearnóg Mhuirfean) is a Georgian garden square on the southside of Dublin city centre.
St Mary's Pro-Cathedral
  • St Mary's Pro-Cathedral

    St Mary's Church (Irish: Leas-Ardeaglais Naomh Muire), known also as St Mary's Pro-Cathedral or simply the Pro-Cathedral, the Chapel in Marlborough Street or the Pro, is a pro-cathedral and is the episcopal seat of the Roman Catholic Archbishop of Dublin and Primate of Ireland.
Grand Canal Dock
  • Grand Canal Dock

    Grand Canal Dock (Irish: Duga na Canálach Móire) is a Southside area near the city centre of Dublin, Ireland. It is located on the border of eastern Dublin 2 and the westernmost part of Ringsend in Dublin 4, surrounding the Grand Canal Docks, an enclosed harbour where the Grand Canal comes to the River Liffey. The area has undergone significant redevelopment since 2000, as part of the Dublin Docklands area redevelopment project. The area has been dubbed "Silicon Docks" (a reference ...
National Botanic Gardens of Ireland
  • National Botanic Gardens of Ireland

    National Botanic Gardens, 300 Botanic Road Dublin 9 Dublin Ireland
    Guided tours of the Gardens all year round- Sundays at 12.00pm & 2.30pm, admission free. Monday-Saturday 11.30am & 3.00pm, €5 pp. Pre-booked tours by arrangement. Ireland's premier garden is a green oasis situated in the leafy suburb of Glasnevin, not far from Dublin city centre. It is just under 50 acres in size and home to over 17,000 different plant species. Famous for its Victorian glasshouses: the Curvilinear Range, designed by Richard Turner, and the Great Palm House, Ireland's only tropical rainforest. ...
Parliament House, Dublin
  • Parliament House, Dublin

    Parliament House (Irish: Tigh Pharlaimint) in Dublin, Ireland, was home to the Parliament of Ireland, and later housed the Bank of Ireland. It was the world's first purpose-built bicameral parliament house. It is located at College Green.
Oscar Wilde Memorial Sculpture
  • Oscar Wilde Memorial Sculpture

    The Oscar Wilde Memorial Sculpture is a collection of three statues in Merrion Square in Dublin, Ireland, commemorating Irish poet and playwright Oscar Wilde. The sculptures were unveiled in 1997 and were designed and made by Danny Osborne.
The Spire of Dublin
  • The Spire of Dublin

    O'Connell St (Monument of Light) Dublin Dublin City Ireland
    The Spire of Dublin, officially titled the Monument of Light (Irish: An Túr Solais), is a large, stainless steel, pin-like monument 121.2 metres (398 ft) in height, located on the site of the former Nelson's Pillar on O'Connell Street in Dublin, Ireland.
Grafton Street
  • Grafton Street

    Grafton Street (Irish: Sráid Grafton) is one of the two principal shopping streets in Dublin city centre, the other being Henry Street. It runs from St Stephen's Green in the south (at the highest point of the street) to College Green in the north (to the lowest point). In 2008, Grafton Street was the fifth most expensive main shopping street in the world, at €5,621/m²/year, and the thirteenth most expensive main shopping street in the world in 2016 at approx ...
Jeanie Johnston
  • Jeanie Johnston

    Jeanie Johnston is a replica of a three masted barque that was originally built in Quebec, Canada, in 1847 by the Scottish-born shipbuilder John Munn. The replica Jeanie Johnston performs a number of functions: an ocean-going sail training vessel at sea and in port converts into a living history museum on 19th century emigration and, in the evenings, is used as a corporate event venue.
Moore Street
  • Moore Street

    Moore Street (Irish: Sráid Uí Mhúraigh) is a street in central Dublin, Ireland, off Henry Street, one of Ireland's main shopping streets. The famous Moore Street open air fruit and vegetable market is Dublin's oldest food market. The market there is considered to be a famous landmark on the northside of the city. Moore Street was the subject of the second CIVIC LIFE film by filmmakers Joe Lawlor and Christine Molloy, starring members of the Dublin-based African production company, Arambe.
Liberty Hall
  • Liberty Hall

    Liberty Hall (Irish: Halla na Saoirse), in Dublin, Ireland, is the headquarters of the Services, Industrial, Professional, and Technical Union (SIPTU). Designed by Desmond Rea O'Kelly, it was formerly the tallest storeyed building in the state, at 59.4 metres, (195 feet) high until it was superseded by the County Hall outside Cork city, which was itself superseded by The Elysian in Cork. Liberty Hall is now the third tallest building in Dublin, after Montevetro (now Google Docks) and the Millennium ...
Keelings
  • Keelings

    Food Central, St Margarets Co Dublin Dublin Ireland
    We are a 100% family owned Irish company. The current farm was established in 1926 and in the 1930s, we began growing fruits and salads and supplying them to the local Dublin markets. With such a long history of growing, we like to think we know a thing or two about fruit and we look forward to sharing our knowledge, passion and love for healthy produce with you and your family. We set up this Facebook page to share with you ...
Spire of Dublin
  • Spire of Dublin

    The Spire of Dublin, alternatively titled the Monument of Light (Irish: An Túr Solais), is a large, stainless steel, pin-like monument 120 metres (390 ft) in height, located on the site of the former Nelson's Pillar on O'Connell Street in Dublin, Ireland.
Clarence Hotel
  • Clarence Hotel

    The Clarence Hotel is a four-star 51-room hotel located at 6–8 Wellington Quay, Dublin 2, Ireland. It is in the Temple Bar neighbourhood, on the River Liffey. It was built in 1852, and bought by U2 lead singer Bono and lead guitarist The Edge and their business partners in 1992, and later refurbished in 1996.
Mountjoy Square
  • Mountjoy Square

    Mountjoy Square (Irish: Cearnóg Mhuinseo) is a Georgian garden square in Dublin, Ireland, on the north side of the city just under a kilometre from the River Liffey. One of five Georgian squares in Dublin, it was planned and developed in the late 18th century by the Luke Gardiner, 1st Viscount Mountjoy. It was surrounded on all sides by terraced, red-brick Georgian houses. Construction began in the early 1790s and the work was completed in 1818. Over the centuries, the square ...
Royal Irish Academy of Music
  • Royal Irish Academy of Music

    The Royal Irish Academy of Music (RIAM) in Dublin, Ireland, is one of Europe's oldest music conservatoires, specialising in Classical Music and the Irish harp. It is located in a Georgian building on Westland Row in Dublin. An institution which offers tuition from age 4 up to doctorate level, the RIAM has taught music performers and composers who have gone on to acclaim on the world stage. It is an associate college of Trinity College, the University of Dublin.
St. Audoen's Church, Dublin (Church of Ireland)
  • St. Audoen's Church, Dublin (Church of Ireland)

    St Audoen's Church is the church of the parish of Saint Audoen /ˈɔːdən/ in the Church of Ireland, located south of the River Liffey at Cornmarket in Dublin, Ireland. This was close to the centre of the medieval city. The parish is in the Diocese of Dublin and Glendalough. St Audoen's is the oldest parish church in Dublin and still used as such. There is a Roman Catholic church of the same name adjacent to it.
Henrietta Street, Dublin
  • Henrietta Street, Dublin

    Henrietta Street (Irish: Sráid Henrietta) is a Dublin street, to the north of Bolton Street on the north side of the city, first laid out and developed by Luke Gardiner during the 1720s. A very wide street relative to streets in other 18th-century cities, it includes a number of very large red-brick city palaces of Georgian design.
Magazine Fort
  • Magazine Fort

    The Magazine Fort is a bastion fort and magazine located within the Phoenix Park, in Dublin, Ireland. Built in 1735, it was occupied by British Armed Forces until 1922 when it was turned over to the Irish Defence Forces after the Anglo-Irish Treaty. The Irish Army continued to operate the site as an ammunition store through the mid-20th century. It was fully demilitarised by the 1980s. The fort is now managed by the Office of Public Works. As of 2015, ...
Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies
  • Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies

    The Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies (DIAS) (Irish: Institiúid Ard-Léinn Bhaile Átha Cliath) was established in 1940 by the then Taoiseach, Éamon de Valera under the Institute for Advanced Studies Act, 1940 in Dublin, Ireland. The Institute consists of 3 schools: the School of Theoretical Physics, the School of Cosmic Physics and the School of Celtic studies. The directors of these schools are currently Professor Werner Nahm, Professor Luke Drury and Professor Ó hUiginn Ruairí. The Institute under the act ...
Molly Malone Statue
  • Molly Malone Statue

    Grafton St Dublin Dublin City Ireland
    The Molly Malone statue in Grafton Street was unveiled by then Lord Mayor of Dublin, Alderman Ben Briscoe during the 1988 Dublin Millennium celebrations, declaring 13 June as Molly Malone Day.
Dublin quays
  • Dublin quays

    The Dublin quays (Irish: Céanna Bhaile Átha Cliath) refers to the two roadways and quays that run along the north and south banks of the River Liffey in Dublin, Ireland. The stretches of the two continuous streets have several different names. However, all but three of the names (Swift's Row, Bachelors Walk and Usher's Island) share the same "Quay" designation. The quays have played an important part in Dublin's history. Much of the southern roadway and about half of the northern ...
Parnell Square
  • Parnell Square

    Parnell Square (Irish: Cearnóg Parnell) is a Georgian square sited at the northern end of O'Connell Street, and west of Mountjoy Square, in the city of Dublin (now Dublin 1), Ireland. Formerly named Rutland Square, it was renamed after Charles Stewart Parnell (1846–1891), as was Parnell Street, which forms the southern side of the square. Surrounded on three sides by terraces of original intact Georgian houses, much of the southern part of the square and its centre is taken up by ...
Gaiety Theatre, Dublin
  • Gaiety Theatre, Dublin

    The Gaiety Theatre is a theatre on South King Street in Dublin, Ireland, off Grafton Street and close to St. Stephen's Green. It specialises in operatic and musical productions, with occasional dramatic shows.
Vicar Street
  • Vicar Street

    Vicar Street is a concert, performing arts centre and events venue in Dublin, Ireland. Located on Thomas Street, Dublin 8, Vicar Street has capacity for 1,050 people for seated performances and 1,500 people for standing gigs. The venue is owned by Harry Crosbie and operated by Peter Aiken. Since opening in 1998, the venue has become a popular setting for a wide range of acts including stand-up comedy, drama performances and a variety of concerts. The first artist to play ...
Law Society of Ireland
  • Law Society of Ireland

    The Law Society of Ireland (in Irish: Dlí-Chumann na hÉireann) is the educational, representative and regulatory body of the solicitors' profession in the Republic of Ireland. As of 2011, the Law Society had over twelve thousand members, all solicitors, a staff of 207 and an annual turnover of €30m.
Father Pat Noise
  • Father Pat Noise

    Father Pat Noise is a fictitious Roman Catholic priest, described on a hoax commemorative plaque installed by two brothers on O'Connell Bridge in Dublin, Ireland. The full text of the plaque reads: THIS PLAQUE COMMEMORATES FR. PAT NOISE ADVISOR TO PEADAR CLANCEY. HE DIED UNDER SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES WHEN HIS CARRIAGE PLUNGED INTO THELIFFEY ON AUGUST 10TH 1919. ERECTED BY THE HSTI The hoaxers installed it in 2004, and owned up in May 2006 after the plaque was brought to the attention of Dublin City Council by a journalist ...
Dublin Zoo Wild Lights
City Hall, Dublin
  • City Hall, Dublin

    The City Hall, Dublin (Irish: Halla na Cathrach, Baile Átha Cliath), originally the Royal Exchange, is a civic building in Dublin, Ireland. It was built between 1769 and 1779 to the designs of architect Thomas Cooley and is a notable example of 18th-century architecture in the city.
Chapel Royal, Dublin
  • Chapel Royal, Dublin

    The Chapel Royal in Dublin Castle was the official Church of Ireland chapel of the Household of the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland from 1814 until the creation of the Irish Free State in 1922. The creation of the new Irish state terminated the office of Lord Lieutenant and British government control in Ireland.
Cathal Brugha Barracks
  • Cathal Brugha Barracks

    Cathal Brugha Barracks (Irish: Dún Chathail Bhrugha) is an Irish Army barracks in Rathmines, Dublin. A key military base of the Irish Defence Forces, it is the headquarters of 2 Brigade, and houses the Military Archives of the Department of Defence.
John's Lane Church
  • John's Lane Church

    John's Lane Church opened in 1874 on the site of St. John's Hospital (founded c. 1180). It is located on Thomas Street, Dublin, close to the centre of the medieval city, and is served by the Augustinian Order.
Sir John Rogerson's Quay
  • Sir John Rogerson's Quay

    Sir John Rogerson's Quay is a street and quay in Dublin on the south bank of the River Liffey between City Quay in the west and Britain Quay. Named for politician and property developer Sir John Rogerson (1648–1724), the quay was formerly part of Dublin Port. It has some of the few remaining campshire warehouses in Dublin.